Latest News...

Current News...

  • 02/16/2017 - Publication in Bioinformatics

    We have published a software tool called GARLIC (Genomic Autozygosity Regions Likelihood-based Inference and Classification) for calling and classifying runs of homozygosity in genome-wide genotype data in the popular TPED/TFAM format based upon the methods of Pemberton et al. (2012). This software will facilitate the accurate inference and classification of ROH in large-scale genotype data sets created by furture population- and disease-genetic studies.

  • 06/23/2016 - CHRIM Operating Grant Award

    We have been awarded a 1-year Children's Hospital Research Institute of Manitoba (CHRIM) Operating Grant to identify an apparent modifier gene for polycystic kidney disease in the Han:SPRD-Cy rat model. In this study, we will use next-generation DNA and RNA sequencing approaches to identify the modifier gene and mutation.

  • 06/14/2016 - Successful Cameroon field mission

    We have just returned from a successful month-long field mission in Cameroon to collect new samples for our exploration of the genetics of body size among West Central African Pygmies and their non-Pygmy neighbours. We collected DNA and trait data on 386 individuals from two pairs of Pygmy and neighboring non-Pygmy populations that will greatly enhance our exploration of genetic and phenotypic diversity among West Central African Pygmies and their non-Pygmy neighbours. Photos from our time in Cameroon can be seen here while videos can be seen here.

  • 05/01/2016 - NSERC Postgraduate Scholarship Award

    Congratulations to PhD Student Sasha Blant, who has been awarded a three-year Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada (NSERC) Postgraduate Scholarship (Doctoral) to continue her exploration of the genetics of body size among West Central African Pygmies and their non-Pygmy neighbours.

Older News...

  • 07/06/2015 - Andrew Kwong joins the team for the Summer

    Andrew Kwong has joined the group as a summer research assistant following his graduation from the University of Toronto Preparatory School in Toronto. In his summer research project, Andrew is focusing on elucidating the relationship between autozygosity and deleterious variation patterns on the X chromosome in worldwide human populations using genome-wide next-generation sequence data.

  • 04/01/2015 - NSERC Discovery Grant Award

    We have been awarded a 5-year Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada (NSERC) Discovery Grant to explore the genetics of body size among West Central African Pygmies and their non-Pygmy neighbours. In this study, we will explore the genetic and evolutionary origins of the diminutive body size of hunter-gatherer Pygmies in relation to agriculturalist non-Pygmies.

  • 03/20/2015 - Online Henry Stewart Talk Published

    My recent talk on consanguinity and genome sharing has just been made available in the Human Population Genetics II Series of Henry Stewart Talks. In this talk, I explain the biological, population, and cultural processes that hive rise to genome sharing among individuals, the inbreeding coefficient as a measure of genome sharing, and why genome sharing is an important determinant of many human monogenic and polygenic traits and diseases.

  • 01/20/2015 - Publication in PNAS

    Our recent study entitled "A comparison of worldwide phonemic and genetic variation in human populations" has just been published in PNAS. In this article, we analyze the largest available datasets of both phonemes and genotypes in worldwide populations to highlight similarities and differences in the ways in which human evolutionary history has shaped contemporary patterns in linguistic and genetic diversity.

  • 01/05/2015 - Sasha Blant joins the team

    Sasha Blant recently joined the group as a PhD Student after completing her M.Sc. in Physiology. In her graduate training, Sasha will be focusing on understanding how demographic and cultural processes influence patterns of genetic diversity and individual genome sharing in worldwide human populations and their role in shaping human phenotypic diversity and disease incidence.

  • 11/18/2014 - Publication in BMC Genomics

    Our recent study entitled "Sequence differences at orthologous microsatellites inflate estimates of human-chimpanzee differentiation" has just been published in BMC Genomics. In this article, we use the human and chimpanzee genome sequences of 138 microsatellites to convert PCR fragment length genotypes into the number of repeats they represent, creating the first human-chimpanzee microsatellite dataset in which all genotypes are commensurable between species.

  • 08/14/2014 - Publication in PLoS Genetics

    Our recent study entitled "Patterns of admixture and population structure in Native populations of Northwest North America" has just been published in PLoS Genetics. In this article, we analyze genome-wide diversity among Indigenous North American populations and provide a comparative framework for understanding the effects of European colonization on indigenous communities throughout the Americas.

  • 08/08/2014 - Letter in The New York Times

    The New York Times recently published a letter highlighting the misappropriation of population-genetic research—including our own—by Nicholas Wade in his book A Troublesome Inheritance (reviewed here) to support his misinformed arguments regarding the origins of differences among human societies in IQ test results, political institutions, and economic development. Please click here to read the full letter and here to view the list of more than 130 faculty members in population genetics and evolutionary biology who signed it. Some additional discussion is available on the blogs of the Nature and Science journals.

  • 07/29/2014 - Publication in Human Heredity

    Our recent study entitled "Population-genetic influences on genomic estimates of the inbreeding coefficient: a global perspective" has just been published in Human Heredity. In this article, we provide insight into population-genetic factors useful for assessing the effect of consanguinity on genomic patterns in different populations.

  • 05/12/2014 - Michelle Kwong rejoins the team for the Summer

    Michelle Kwong has rejoined the group as a summer research assistant following her first year as an undergraduate student pursing a Bachelor's in Health Sciences at McMaster University. In her summer research project, Michelle is focusing on developing an improved likelihood-based method for identifying regions of autozygosity in genome-wide SNP and next-generation sequence data.

  • 02/21/2014 - Umesh Ramachandran leaves the team

    Postdoctoral Fellow Umesh Ramachandran left the group to take up the position of Senior Scientist at Symvivo Incorporated based in Vancouver, British Columbia. We wish Umesh all the best in his future endeavours.

  • 11/23/2013 - Publication in Glia

    Our recent study entitled "A mutation in the canine gene encoding folliculin-interacting protein 2 (FNIP2) associated with a unique disruption in spinal cord myelination" has just been published in Glia. In this article, we identify the protein whose disruption results in "shaky puppy syndrome" in the Weimaraner breed of dog, and our findings have diagnostic implications for developmental defects in myelination of unknown etiology.

  • 09/23/2013 - Umesh Ramachandran joins the team

    Umesh Ramachandran recently joined the group as a postdoctoral fellow after completing his Ph.D. in Biosystems Engineering. In his postdoctoral research, Umesh will be focusing on understanding worldwide patterns of individual genomic sharing through runs of homozygosity, and devising new approaches for detecting and assessing these patterns.

  • 09/06/2013 - Publication in the Genetics in Medicine

    Our letter to the editor entitled "Runs of homozygosity and parental relatedness" has just been published in Genetics in Medicine. In this letter, we draw attention to new findings on ROH that can improve upon the recommended ACMG guidelines for incidental evidence of parental relatedness during genomic testing.

  • 07/10/2013 - Michelle Kwong joins the team for the Summer

    Michelle Kwong has joined the group as a summer research assistant following her graduation from the Talented Offerings for Programs in the Sciences program at the Marc Garneau Collegiate Institute in Toronto. In her summer research project, Michelle is focusing on the sequence properties of microsatellite loci in the chimpanzee genome in relation to those of their orthologous loci in the human genome.

  • 07/11/2013 - "What Lies Within (Runs of Homozygosity)?" - Long ROH are enriched for deleterious variation

    Our article "Long runs of homozygosity are enriched for deleterious variation" was the Featured Article in the July 11 issue of the American Journal of Human Genetics.

  • 06/06/2013 - Publication in the American Journal of Human Genetics

    Our recent study entitled "Long runs of homozygosity are enriched for deleterious variation" has just been published in the American Journal of Human Genetics. In this article, we shed new light on the relationship between homozygosity and the distribution of deleterious variation in the human genome, and our findings have important implications for future disease-mapping studies.

  • 05/06/2013 - Database of Homozygous Segments (DHS) Launched

    We have recently made available our Database of Homozygous Segments (DHS) that allows anyone to explore the genomic distribution of the homozygous segments we identified in our recent American Journal of Human Genetics article "Genomic patterns of homozygosity in worldwide human populations." To explore this exciting database click here.

  • 05/01/2013 - Publication in G3:Genes|Genomes|Genetics

    Our recent study entitled "Population structure in a comprehensive genomic data set on human microsatellite variation" has just been published in G3:Genes|Genomes|Genetics. In this article, we combine eight human population-genetic data sets and one chimpanzee data set to create the largest data sets of their kind reported to date, and provide a resource for use in future human population-genetic studies.

  • 02/19/2013 - The lab has moved to the University of Manitoba

    Following my appointment as an Assistant Professor of Biochemistry and Medical Genetics at the University of Manitoba, the lab has moved to Winnipeg! We are seeking new members at the graduate and postdoctoral levels; if you are interested in helping us to explore the exciting opportunities here at U of M click here.

  • 08/14/2012 - Stanford Report article by Max McClure

    Max's story covers our article reporting genomic patterns of homozygosity in worldwide human populations that was published in the August 9 issue of the American Journal of Human Genetics.

  • 08/09/2012 - Publication in the American Journal of Human Genetics

    Our recent study entitled "Genomic patterns of homozygosity in worldwide human populations" has just been published in the American Journal of Human Genetics. In this article we shed new light on the influence of population history on homozygosity in the human genome, and provide baseline homozygosity patterns that can assist in homozygosity mapping of disease genes.

  • 05/29/2012 - Publication in the American Journal of Physical Anthropology

    Our recent study entitled "Impact of restricted marital practices on genetic variation in an endogamous Gujarati group" has just been published in the American Journal of Physical Anthropology. In this article, we illustrate how restricted marital practices imposed by the caste system have introduced fine-scale genetic structure into the population of India.

  • 09/01/2011 - Moved to Stanford University

    The Rosenberg Lab, including myself, has moved from the University of Michigan to Stanford University!

  • 11/30/2010 - Genome Technology magazine article by Tracy Vence

    Tracy's story covers our article reporting the identification of unexpected relative pairs in HapMap Phase III that was published in the October 8 issue of the American Journal of Human Genetics.

  • 10/15/2010 - "This Month in Genetics Research" - Relative pairs in HapMap Phase III

    Our article "Inference of Unexpected Genetic Relatedness among Individuals in HapMap Phase III" was featured in the "This Month in Genetics Research" section of the October 2010 issue of the journal Genetics.

  • 10/08/2010 - "He Ain't Heavy, He's My Brother" - Relative pairs in HapMap Phase III

    Our article "Inference of Unexpected Genetic Relatedness among Individuals in HapMap Phase III" was the Featured Article in the October 8 issue of the American Journal of Human Genetics.

  • 05/19/2010 - University of Michigan CGHM Fellowship Award

    I have been awarded a University of Michigan Center for Genetics in Health and Medicine postdoctoral fellowship for 2010-2011.